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Okay tomorrow I have an unbroken sequence of lecture, lecture, lecture, supervision, lecture from 10am to 3pm, and there’s going to be rain which the BBC describes as ‘heavy and squally’ because of the remains of an Atlantic hurricane. But I’m also getting interviewed by one of the university papers about my show. So every cloud, I guess.

And there are going to be a lot of clouds.

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I’m just reading, like, so much Ancient Greek poetry. It does shit to you. I’m starting to speak exclusively in dactylic hexameter.

I’m just reading, like, so much Ancient Greek poetry. It does shit to you. I’m starting to speak exclusively in dactylic hexameter.

I can never take avage syrup seriously because every time I hear ‘Agave’ all I can think of is the mother of Pentheus who was driven into a crazed frenzy of animal lust and ferocity under the spell of Dionysus and tore the body her own son to shreds and covered herself in his blood because she thought he was a lion.

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I’m inherently sceptical of any ‘test’ which purports to be able to use yes/no questions to classify the entire spectrum of human minds (or, if you want, ‘souls’) into one of a small number of discreet groups.
If I remember correctly, the questions are the typical ‘personality test’ fare: extremely vague, forcing the reader to make blanket generalisations about themselves (Guess what? Everyone is sometimes outgoing and sometimes timid) that would more than likely vary depending on the day they took it. (Last week I met three different people for lunch. I was feeling pretty gregarious last week).Like, of course, some people are generally more or less pragmatic, or compulsive, or indecisive, but we have a perfectly good system for identifying these traits in ourselves and others. They’re called ‘adjectives’. Not some four-letter designation which attempts to compartmentalise people in a way not that much more advanced than the Medieval humours. 

I’m inherently sceptical of any ‘test’ which purports to be able to use yes/no questions to classify the entire spectrum of human minds (or, if you want, ‘souls’) into one of a small number of discreet groups.

If I remember correctly, the questions are the typical ‘personality test’ fare: extremely vague, forcing the reader to make blanket generalisations about themselves (Guess what? Everyone is sometimes outgoing and sometimes timid) that would more than likely vary depending on the day they took it. (Last week I met three different people for lunch. I was feeling pretty gregarious last week).

Like, of course, some people are generally more or less pragmatic, or compulsive, or indecisive, but we have a perfectly good system for identifying these traits in ourselves and others. They’re called ‘adjectives’. Not some four-letter designation which attempts to compartmentalise people in a way not that much more advanced than the Medieval humours. 

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"The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be."
In her cover essay on silencing women in the October 2014 issue of Harper’s, Rebecca Solnit once again proves that she is one of our era’s greatest essayist – further evidence here and here. (via explore-blog)

(via fauxparse)

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salvadordali-art:

After Michelangelo’s ‘Squatting Child,’ 1982
Salvador Dali

salvadordali-art:

After Michelangelo’s ‘Squatting Child,’ 1982

Salvador Dali

(via jools-holland)

I basically think the entire Meyers-Briggs personality test thing is bullshit, aside from being totally pointless, but my friend Helen forced me to take a test once and I don’t remember what combination I got and I’ll never have the patience to take it again, but I remember the website said that I had the same type as Dr Peter Venkman and that I possessed an ‘earthy sensuality’, and, honestly, that’s enough for me to be satisfied.

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The Classicists of the world are in awe of the opinion provided by you and women like you.Never in the field of prose composition has so much been owed by so many to so few.

The Classicists of the world are in awe of the opinion provided by you and women like you.

Never in the field of prose composition has so much been owed by so many to so few.